Social Etiquette at Work

An Employee Handbook usually tells employees what conduct is considered unacceptable. However, less is said about proper or preferred conduct. There are a lot of little things employees (and managers) can do to make your company a more enjoyable place to work.  [click to read more …]

Digging Deep

I’ve hired two employees who haven’t worked out even though their resumes and interviews seemed to fit the position exactly. How can I be more confident of my hires in the future?  [click to read more …]

Working Interviews

I have a candidate work for a couple of days as a trial period. If I like them, I hire them. If I don’t, I pay them cash for the time worked. This has worked well for me so far. Is this okay?  [click to read more …]

Less Than the Ideal Candidate

It can be difficult to find and hire the ideal person. Many candidates have spent more effort in improving their interview skills than their job skills. Once you’ve discovered the employee has fewer skills or knowledge than you thought, you have decisions to make.  [click to read more …]

Hiring is Tough

I’m having a very difficult time finding and hiring employees. What am I doing wrong?  [click to read more …]

Hybrid Work Stats

I can’t decide what I want to do with my employees now that they can work in the office again. Any ideas?  [click to read more …]

Rescinding Offer Letters

A written offer letter is often desirable because it can protect your company by ensuring your offer is not misunderstood. In some situations, such as when you want to run a background check, California requires a written offer letter to be provided first. In that case, you add a contingency clause.  [click to read more …]

Retention Ending

“I’ve managed to keep most of my employees working over this past year and they’ve seemed fairly happy here. However, lately, I’ve seen signs that make me think they aren’t as happy as I thought and are looking for a new job.”

Your HR Survival Tip

Congratulations on retaining your employees when so many companies have had layoffs because of the pandemic. Employees have felt lucky to keep their jobs over the past year and haven’t wanted to do anything that might put their name on the layoff list. However, that doesn’t mean they feel their current position is the best job ever or even the best they can do.

The clock is ticking. Companies had to dramatically downsize and even close in the past year… but that’s ending and companies are looking to kickstart their businesses again. As more and more employees are vaccinated and feeling safer, they will be assessing their job and the job market. In fact, there is a study that shows nearly 50% of employees will be looking at their options.

One of the reasons we’re expecting this is because employees are becoming less fearful of taking a chance on a new company and  [click to read more …]

American Rescue Plan Act of 2021

The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) was just signed into law last week. This article will only discuss two items from this new law, the FFCRA updates and the employee retention credit through CARES.

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) initially began last year on 4/1/2020. This law required employers to notify employees of potential paid time off when they had COVID symptoms, when they couldn’t work due to lack of childcare, and a few other reasons. FFCRA expired on 12/31/2020 but was then extended to 3/31/2021. The extension removed the employer mandate requiring notification to employees and payment for COVID-related time off. However, the tax credit was still available to those companies who chose to continue offering the pay to employees.

ARPA has extended FFCRA to 9/30/2021. In addition, while not mandated, companies will continue receiving the tax credit if they pay employees for FFCRA time off. The most interesting aspect of this new law was the reset of hours for the time off. This means if an employee had previously received the allowed 80 hours of FFCRA sick pay, the clock starts over as of 4/1/2021, and the previously paid time doesn’t count against the employee’s  [click to read more …]

Retaining Those Documents

“I have a few boxes of old employee files in my warehouse. Is it okay to just throw them out?”

Your HR Survival Tip

The documents in employee files have a required shelf life. The length of retention is often related to the laws concerning how much time an employee or entity has to make a claim and or file a lawsuit where those documents may be needed. Even when you are no longer legally required to keep the documents, attorneys suggest you keep them for the life of the company… just to be safe. This is much easier now that we can digitize those docs. However, be sure to store the digital files on a protected drive so only authorized employees can access them.

No matter what the document may be, do not destroy anything while the employee still works for you. If your managers keep separate notes or records, ask for copies if an employee’s manager is changing or leaving. Below is a very basic list of minimum retention requirements:

Recruitment, hiring, and job placement records — 3 years or longer for any claim or litigation about your hiring practices. Payroll records, including timecards, time-off accruals, schedules,  [click to read more …]